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Tag: History

Barre Historical Society

Barre Historical Society

Fire place at Barre Historical Society Barre

The town of Barre was were I grew up. It is a rural area that is not far from major urban areas. Despite being in a very different place now, it was a great place to grow up. Located in Worchester County it was incorporated in 1774 as Hutchinson after Thomas Hutchinson the Governor of the colony. However, in 1776 it was renamed Barre after Isaac Barre, a Parliament member that opposed the stamp tax. The Barre Historical Society is on the west side of the town common at 18 Common St. Barre Historical Society is open on Thursdays from 10 am until noon and on Sundays during the farmers market (summer mornings) and can be called at 978-355-4978.

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Hardwick Historical Society

Hardwick Historical Society

Hardwick

Hardwick is a small town next to the one I grew up in. Made up of the villages of Hardwick, Gilbertville, Wheelwright, and Old Furnace. The town of Hardwick was settled in 1737 and incorporated in 1739. The Hardwick Historical Society was founded in 1961 and bought its current building from the town for one dollar. The building was the site of a school until the 1930’s. Latter it was used for engineers working on the Quabbin reservoir before becoming a meeting place for boy scoots and polling.

Located on the east side of the town common, in a brick building.  The Hardwick Historical Society is open Sundays from 12 to 2 PM. In addition you can find them on Facebook.

 

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Private American guns to the UK

Private American guns to the UK

The American Committee for the Defense of British Homes

Every so often you see something on social media and the comments section is the most interesting part. Ok, who am I kidding the comments are usually the interesting part. As you can see on the left we have an add to send a gun to help defend Britain by something called The American Committee for the Defense of British Homes (we will call it ACDBH for the rest of the article). Like a lot of small things from World War Two, it is hard to find much information on it. Sadly a lot of it is antidotal. So the two questions in the comments were; “Is it real?”, “Why?” and “What happened to the guns afterward?”

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Chiang Kai-shek Memorial Hall

Chiang Kai-shek Memorial Hall

 

Chiang Kai-shek Memorial Hall

On my June visit to Taipei, I went to Chiang Kai-shek Memorial Hall. Completed in 1980 as a memorial to the former leader of the Republic of China it is still a popular tourist destination. With the change in views of Chiang Kai-shek, feelings and the impressions of the hall have shifted. The open area is now known as Liberty Square and this year the government has announced the Hall will be changed to face “history, recognizing agony, and respecting human rights.”

Artwork at o Chiang Kai-shek Memorial Hall MRT station

 

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National Museum of Taiwan History

National Museum of Taiwan History

National Museum of Taiwan History
Debonair Dylan with Historic Japanese Police officers

If you did not know, I love history. It was the one subject I was good at in school. So when I visited Tainan I was excited to visit the National History Museum of Taiwan. The museum opened in 2011 and has about 60,000 artifacts. It covers Aboriginal, Dutch, Spanish, Chinese, and Japanese influence on the island.

The museum is best viewed from the top floor and working your way down. On the top floor is the special exhibits. When I went the exhibits were on New Migrants, Food in Taiwan and on the 2.28 incident. 

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Long Weekend in Macau

Long Weekend in Macau

Street in Macau Peninsula Macau

Macau is a former Portuguese colony and now a haven for gambling and prostitution. Some call it the Los Vegas of the east, I would not say that. I would say that it is a great place to visit on a long weekend.

Macau was probably the easiest country I have ever entered. In fact, transferring flights in Shanghai is harder. Also as a Special Administrative Region (SAR) of China it has normal internet. A quick scan of my passport and a slip of paper and I was free to wander around Macau visa-free for 30 days. Both Macanese Pataca (MOP) and Hong Kong Dollar (HKD) are used in Macau. Some restaurants and shops will also take Renminbi (CNY). MOP and HKD are generally treated as interchangeable in Macau except in the casinos where they seem to only take HKD

Macau Peninsula:

This is where I stayed; it is connected to the mainland of China. On the northern border is a wall and there are many historical sites along with older casinos. I stayed at Macau Masters Hotel.

Taipa:

Island to the south of the Peninsula, the airport is here, as are some interesting historical sites, but it is primarily residential. The university is also there and it is quite hilly.

Cotai:

A strip of reclaimed land where the largest casinos are. It connects what use to be the separate islands of Taipa and Coloane. It’s name is a really inventive fusion of the two islands it connects.  It is basically the strip and crowded with huge new casinos.

Coloane:

I did not travel here, it is the southernmost part of Macau. It is the least developed part of Macau and had pirates operating out of it until 1910

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